jaws-and-claws:

Gänsegeier by CROW1973 on Flickr.
fuckyeahdinoart:

Paleoscape 9 - Corythosaurus c by *highdarktemplar
kenbrasai:

The Problem with Pterosaurs by amorousdino
amnhnyc:

Behold Dark Wing, an exquisitely preserved pterosaur fossil making its U.S. debut on April 5.
Discovered in Germany in 2001, the so-called Dark Wing fossil is considered by paleontologists to be a particularly important specimen for the amount of detail preserved, and it has never before been exhibited outside of Germany. 
Learn more about Rhamphorhynchus muensteri.

amnhnyc:

Behold Dark Wing, an exquisitely preserved pterosaur fossil making its U.S. debut on April 5.

Discovered in Germany in 2001, the so-called Dark Wing fossil is considered by paleontologists to be a particularly important specimen for the amount of detail preserved, and it has never before been exhibited outside of Germany. 

Learn more about Rhamphorhynchus muensteri.

hoteldilong:

I have begun a new project, entitled “Fossils of the Science Museum of Minnesota,” where I render life restorations of each fossil animal on display at said museum, where I happen to volunteer.  This is the first of around eighty or so.
Here’s this picture’s caption:
"Outside of the fossils gallery proper, a cast of the gigantic pterosaur Quetzalcoatlus hangs high above the lobby floor. The cast itself is somewhat speculative, as it is scaled to a single gigantic bone. From below it’s almost difficult to grasp just how enormous it is.”

hoteldilong:

I have begun a new project, entitled “Fossils of the Science Museum of Minnesota,” where I render life restorations of each fossil animal on display at said museum, where I happen to volunteer.  This is the first of around eighty or so.


Here’s this picture’s caption:

"Outside of the fossils gallery proper, a cast of the gigantic pterosaur Quetzalcoatlus hangs high above the lobby floor. The cast itself is somewhat speculative, as it is scaled to a single gigantic bone. From below it’s almost difficult to grasp just how enormous it is.”

prehistoric-birds:

Oviraptor by Esther van Hulsen
reptiglo:

Uromastyx by TARIQ-M on Flickr.I has stick!

reptiglo:

Uromastyx by TARIQ-M on Flickr.

I has stick!

dryptosaurus:

Pterodactylus by Zdeněk Burian

dryptosaurus:

Pterodactylus by Zdeněk Burian

justinwwoo:

Jurassic Park - Clever Girl
Re-inked and colored this piece of Jurassic Park fan art from a few years ago. 

justinwwoo:

Jurassic Park - Clever Girl

Re-inked and colored this piece of Jurassic Park fan art from a few years ago. 

feathered-dinosaurs-dammit:

This is the original cover of  “Forerunners Of Mammals” by Anusuya Chinsamy-Turan published by Indiana University Press; art by Luis V. Rey.
Seriously, check out the his work (and the book). This is his original blog post.

feathered-dinosaurs-dammit:

This is the original cover of  “Forerunners Of Mammals” by Anusuya Chinsamy-Turan published by Indiana University Press; art by Luis V. Rey.

Seriously, check out the his work (and the book). This is his original blog post.

fuckyeahdinoart:

Brachylophosaurus by ~CraftyCreatures
palaeopedia:

The frightful Lizard, Daspletosaurus (1970)
Phylum : ChordataClass : ReptiliaOrder : SaurischiaSuborder : TheropodaFamily : TyrannosauridaeSubfamily : TyrannosaurinaeGenus : DaspletosaurusSpecies : D. torosus
Late Cretaceous (80,6 - 72 Ma)
9 m long and 2 500 kg (size)
Oldman formation, Canada (map)
Daspletosaurus is one of those names that sounds better in English translation than in the original Greek—“frightening lizard” is both scarier and more pronounceable! Other than its position near the top of the late Cretaceous food chain, there’s not much to say about this tyrannosaur: like its close cousin, Tyrannosaurus rex, Daspletosaurus combined a massive head, a muscular body, and many, many sharp, pointy teeth with a ravenous appetite and puny, comical-looking arms. It’s likely that this genus included many similar-looking species, not all of which have been discovered and/or described.

palaeopedia:

The frightful Lizard, Daspletosaurus (1970)

Phylum : Chordata
Class : Reptilia
Order : Saurischia
Suborder : Theropoda
Family : Tyrannosauridae
Subfamily : Tyrannosaurinae
Genus : Daspletosaurus
Species : D. torosus

  • Late Cretaceous (80,6 - 72 Ma)
  • 9 m long and 2 500 kg (size)
  • Oldman formation, Canada (map)

Daspletosaurus is one of those names that sounds better in English translation than in the original Greek—“frightening lizard” is both scarier and more pronounceable! Other than its position near the top of the late Cretaceous food chain, there’s not much to say about this tyrannosaur: like its close cousin, Tyrannosaurus rex, Daspletosaurus combined a massive head, a muscular body, and many, many sharp, pointy teeth with a ravenous appetite and puny, comical-looking arms. It’s likely that this genus included many similar-looking species, not all of which have been discovered and/or described.

rhamphotheca:

What’s different about this woodpecker?

It’s an American Three-toed woodpecker (Picoides dorsalis), so it has just three toes per foot as does the black-backed woodpecker, while most woodpeckers have four toes. American three-toeds feed primarily by flaking away bark from dead trees to find insect larvae, rather than drilling holes into wood as many other kinds of woodpeckers do.

top photo - pbonenfant; bttm photo - NPS

(via: Yellowstone National Park)

bonesmen:

Dunkleosteus! The awesomest fish to ever exist in the pre-history of this planet!

thatscienceguy:

A Woolly Rhinoceros, this thing looks awesome! I didn’t even know there was such a thing! But unfortunately extinct ~2.5 million years ago
9 more extinct animals and their story.

thatscienceguy:

A Woolly Rhinoceros, this thing looks awesome! I didn’t even know there was such a thing! But unfortunately extinct ~2.5 million years ago

9 more extinct animals and their story.