libutron:

Starred knob-tailed gecko
Looking in detail the tail of Nephrurus stellatus (Gekkonidae) is perfectly understandable why this Australian gecko is known as Starred knob-tailed gecko. The body and tail are marked with conical tubercles and rosettes.
Photo credit: ©Jordan Vos |  [Top]  -  [Bottom]
Locality: Goldfields-Esperance, Western Australia
Zoom Info
libutron:

Starred knob-tailed gecko
Looking in detail the tail of Nephrurus stellatus (Gekkonidae) is perfectly understandable why this Australian gecko is known as Starred knob-tailed gecko. The body and tail are marked with conical tubercles and rosettes.
Photo credit: ©Jordan Vos |  [Top]  -  [Bottom]
Locality: Goldfields-Esperance, Western Australia
Zoom Info

libutron:

Starred knob-tailed gecko

Looking in detail the tail of Nephrurus stellatus (Gekkonidae) is perfectly understandable why this Australian gecko is known as Starred knob-tailed geckoThe body and tail are marked with conical tubercles and rosettes.

Photo credit: ©Jordan Vos |  [Top]  -  [Bottom]

Locality: Goldfields-Esperance, Western Australia

emuwren:

The Masked Trogon - trogon personatus, is fairly common in humid highland forests in South America, mainly the Andes and tepuis. Female bird pictured.
Photo by Bill Holsten.

emuwren:

The Masked Trogon - trogon personatus, is fairly common in humid highland forests in South America, mainly the Andes and tepuis. Female bird pictured.

Photo by Bill Holsten.

emuwren:

The Grey Heron - Ardea cinerea, is a wading bird of the heron family Ardeidae, native throughout temperate Europe and Asia and also parts of Africa. 
Photo by JJ. Harrison.

emuwren:

The Grey Heron - Ardea cinerea, is a wading bird of the heron family Ardeidae, native throughout temperate Europe and Asia and also parts of Africa. 

Photo by JJ. Harrison.

archosaurophilia:

The Kagu (Rhynochetos jubatus) is a curious bird native to the montane forests of the French overseas collectivity of New Caledonia. Its placement among the avian family tree has been complicated since the time of its discovery, Once thought to be an ardeid like egrets and herons, it was considered in more recent times to be a gruiform. Of late, it’s usually been allied to the sunbittern of Central and South America, suggesting that the two species may be part of an ancient, Gondwanan radiation of birds.
It’s average-sized so far as ground-dwelling birds go, averaging at around 55 cm long. Strictly carnivorous, its diet consists mostly of invertebrates and small reptiles from the forest floor. Its generic name (‘rhyno’ = nose and ‘chetos’ = corn) stems from the ‘nasal corns’, a pair of flaps over the nostrils unique to the Kagu among all birds.
It is the heraldic bird of New Caledonia, and despite pressure from introduced mammals which has reduced its range on the island, is the focus of a number of dedicated conservation efforts which have seen considerable success.

archosaurophilia:

The Kagu (Rhynochetos jubatus) is a curious bird native to the montane forests of the French overseas collectivity of New Caledonia. Its placement among the avian family tree has been complicated since the time of its discovery, Once thought to be an ardeid like egrets and herons, it was considered in more recent times to be a gruiform. Of late, it’s usually been allied to the sunbittern of Central and South America, suggesting that the two species may be part of an ancient, Gondwanan radiation of birds.

It’s average-sized so far as ground-dwelling birds go, averaging at around 55 cm long. Strictly carnivorous, its diet consists mostly of invertebrates and small reptiles from the forest floor. Its generic name (‘rhyno’ = nose and ‘chetos’ = corn) stems from the ‘nasal corns’, a pair of flaps over the nostrils unique to the Kagu among all birds.

It is the heraldic bird of New Caledonia, and despite pressure from introduced mammals which has reduced its range on the island, is the focus of a number of dedicated conservation efforts which have seen considerable success.

sagansense:

For those of you dinosaur-lovers who are fans of “Sue” - the largest, most complete, and most preserved Tyrannosaurus Rex specimens ever found - this film (in theaters and on demand now) will be quite a familiar and rewarding journey to experience.

About the film:

When Paleontologist Peter Larson and his team from the Black Hills Institute made the world’s greatest dinosaur discovery in 1990, they knew it was the find of a lifetime; the largest, most complete T. rex ever found. But during a ten-year battle with the U.S. government, powerful museums, Native American tribes, and competing paleontologists they found themselves not only fighting to keep their dinosaur but fighting for their freedom as well.

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Based on the book "Rex Appeal: The Amazing Story of Sue, the Dinosaur That Changed Science, the Law, and My Life" by Peter Larson and Kristin Donnan.

While working in the promotional marketing industry years ago, I had the pleasure of coordinating the Chicago Field Museum’s promotional campaign to highlight the “Sue” exhibit, where a street team distributed promo materials and a model actor donned the workable T. Rex costume around downtown Chicago.

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more info on “Sue”…

I was pretty bummed I couldn’t make it out to Chicago for the debut of the Field Museum’s “Sue” inquiry to their collection, so I’m personally excited for this film because it’s a very well deserved dedication to the men and women responsible for preserving history for generations ahead.

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learn more @FieldMuseum

For more beyond what the movie trailer does not explain - regarding Chicago Field Museum’s moment in which they acquired “Sue” - read the related Washington Post article and watch the news clip entailed!

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