palaeopedia:

The Teilhardina (1940)
Phylum : ChordataClass : MammaliaOrder : PrimatesSuborder : HaplorhiniFamily : OmomyidaeGenus : TeilhardinaSpecies : T. crassidens, T. belgica, T. americana, T. brandti, T. demisa, T. tenuicula, T. asiatica, T. magnoliana
Early Eocene (56 - 47 Ma)
China, North America and Europe (map)
Teilhardina was an early marmoset-like primate that lived in Europe, North America and Asia during in the Early Eocene epoch, about 56-47 million years ago. The paleontologist George Gaylord Simpson is credited with naming it after the French paleontologist, Jesuit and philosopher Teilhard de Chardin.
The placement of this genus is uncertain and it is likely to be polyphyletic. Two species (T. belgica and T. asiatica) appear to be haplorrhine. The others appear to be anaptomorphine omomyids (and thus more closely related to the tarsiers than to simians) and should have a new genus erected.

palaeopedia:

The Teilhardina (1940)

Phylum : Chordata
Class : Mammalia
Order : Primates
Suborder : Haplorhini
Family : Omomyidae
Genus : Teilhardina
Species : T. crassidens, T. belgica, T. americana, T. brandti, T. demisa, T. tenuicula, T. asiatica, T. magnoliana

  • Early Eocene (56 - 47 Ma)
  • China, North America and Europe (map)

Teilhardina was an early marmoset-like primate that lived in Europe, North America and Asia during in the Early Eocene epoch, about 56-47 million years ago. The paleontologist George Gaylord Simpson is credited with naming it after the French paleontologist, Jesuit and philosopher Teilhard de Chardin.

The placement of this genus is uncertain and it is likely to be polyphyletic. Two species (T. belgica and T. asiatica) appear to be haplorrhine. The others appear to be anaptomorphine omomyids (and thus more closely related to the tarsiers than to simians) and should have a new genus erected.

lostbeasts:

Ornithocheirus.One of the largest Cretaceous pterosaurs- though still dwarfed by the giant Quetzalcoatlus, whose wingspan was estimated to have been able to reach over 21 metres in length. Ornithocheirus would probably have had a wingspan of 6 metres.

lostbeasts:

Ornithocheirus.

One of the largest Cretaceous pterosaurs- though still dwarfed by the giant Quetzalcoatlus, whose wingspan was estimated to have been able to reach over 21 metres in length. Ornithocheirus would probably have had a wingspan of 6 metres.

earthstory:

Saccocoma tenellaThis fossil is one of the most common creatures found in the Jurassic aged Solnhofen limestone, the famous deposits in Germany where the earliest feathered dinosaur fossils were located.This guy is much tinier and was a free-floating crinoid. Crinoids are some of the most common fossils found in the Paleozoic, but most of them were attached to the ocean floor. These crinoids had no stalk, no connection to the ground. They probably still were filter feeders, taking nutrition from small particles floating in the water, but scientists are still working to understand the details of their motion. Their arms curl up on death, but were most likely extended during life and used to both direct plankton in towards it mouth and maintain its position in the water.Really cool looking, not as well known fossil from one of the most famous units in the world.-JBBImage credit: https://www.flickr.com/photos/worf/215445272Read more:http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00015-011-0059-zhttp://www.palass-pubs.org/palaeontology/pdf/Vol37/Pages%20121-129.pdfhttp://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/mesozoic/jurassic/solnhofen.html

earthstory:

Saccocoma tenella

This fossil is one of the most common creatures found in the Jurassic aged Solnhofen limestone, the famous deposits in Germany where the earliest feathered dinosaur fossils were located.

This guy is much tinier and was a free-floating crinoid. Crinoids are some of the most common fossils found in the Paleozoic, but most of them were attached to the ocean floor. These crinoids had no stalk, no connection to the ground. They probably still were filter feeders, taking nutrition from small particles floating in the water, but scientists are still working to understand the details of their motion. Their arms curl up on death, but were most likely extended during life and used to both direct plankton in towards it mouth and maintain its position in the water.

Really cool looking, not as well known fossil from one of the most famous units in the world.

-JBB

Image credit: https://www.flickr.com/photos/worf/215445272

Read more:
http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00015-011-0059-z
http://www.palass-pubs.org/palaeontology/pdf/Vol37/Pages%20121-129.pdf
http://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/mesozoic/jurassic/solnhofen.html